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Diamond Spritz Fizz


1.5 oz
An Italian aperitif made of bitter orange, gentian, rhubarb and cinchona with other ingredients. Usually 11% ABV.
0.25 oz
The most common fruit juice used in cocktails. This citrus juice is about 6% acid; pure citric acid. Lemon juice should be used the day it is squeezed, some like it freshly squeezed and others like it a few hours old.
0.5 oz
Also refered to as French vermouth, these are (usually) colorless vermouths that have not been sweetened, containing less than 4% sugar.
0.5 oz
A syrup produced by bees (apis). Pure honey is 82% sugar and very viscous, if you add 64g water to every 100g honey you can make a thinner honey syrup that will substitute (with respect to sweetness) for simple syrup in any recipe, equivalent to 1.1:1 honey to water by volume. We try to always use 1:1 syrups by mass. However, most sources measure honey syrups by volume, this tends to make comparing recipes across sources that use honey syrups complicated, we tried to state what the original source uses in the recipe text. If no extra information is given, assume the syrup to be 1:1 by volume (eq ~1.4:1 by mass). Proteins in natural honey provide structure to bubbles in shaken drinks.
0.25 oz
A Swiss amaro made with 25 roots and herbs, including bitter orange, gentian, hyssop, rhubarb and wormwood; 28% ABV.
1 tsp
A citrus juice used in many cocktails, both for its sweet and tart taste and its color. Orange juice, unlike lemon and lime, can be kept fresh for days. In a blind taste test, most people liked day-old orange juice.
1
You know what eggs are. In cocktails, eggs are used for their foaming properties, giving the drink a rich and creamy texture. The eggs proteins form a 'net' that traps air and liquid extremely well; for this reason, drinks that contain eggs are shaken. They are also used for egg washing, a type of booze washing. Some cocktails use only the egg white (fizzes) and some use the whole egg or only the yolk (flips). There are common non-egg substitutes out there, check out insta-foam
2.5 oz
A carbonated wine usually from natural fermentation, but increasingly via carbon dioxide injection.
1 peel
An orange colored citrus fruit. Many types of orange make an appearance in cocktails. The peel and juice are equally valuable to diverse cocktails.

Add all ingredients, except the wine, in a shaker. Dry shake, without ice, to emulsify. Add ice and shake again for 20 seconds. Strain into a Collins glass over a very small amount of ice. Slowly top with the sparkling wine. Garnish with an orange twist. #shake #ontherocks


Adapted from Isaac Shumway for Toscanini, San Francisco, CA.


Fresh
Creamy
Spritz, 2016
avg. 1.0 (1)
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