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IBA Cocktails

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Polynesian Remedy

Penicillin rum riff.


2 oz
A subset of aged (dark) rums that specifically come from Jamaica. These rums are highly regarded for their unusual pot-still funk, necessary for certain classic cocktails.
0.5 oz
A sweet syrup made from almonds, sugar, and rose water or orange flower water. Sometimes other nut derived syrups are referred to as orgeat. You can make this yourself! There's a few recipes, this one if from liquid Intelligence. Combine 660g very hot water with 200g nuts of your choice (almonds are traditional). Blend together at high speed, then strain through a fine strainer or cheescloth. Add salt if you'd like. Then combine 500g nut milk with 500g sugar, blend to combine. If the emulsion breaks, use a stick blender to quickly recombine (or shake hard before using). If you're up for it, add 1.75g Ticaloid 210s and 0.2g xanthan gum to stablize the emulsion. If you can't find Ticaloid, use a mixture of gum arabic and xanthan gum in a ratio of 9:1. This recipe doesn't use rose or orange flower water, if you'd like you can add small teaspoon of either.
0.5 oz
A syrup with ginger root flavoring. Make it yourself: Combine 120mL fresh ginger juice, 100g superfine sugar (about 2:1.5 by mass). Or you can also boil some ginger slices in a simple syrup mixture. We always assume a 1:1 syrup unless otherwise noted in the recipe itself.
0.5 oz
A syrup produced by bees (apis). Pure honey is 82% sugar and very viscous, if you add 64g water to every 100g honey you can make a thinner honey syrup that will substitute (with respect to sweetness) for simple syrup in any recipe, equivalent to 1.1:1 honey to water by volume. We try to always use 1:1 syrups by mass. However, most sources measure honey syrups by volume, this tends to make comparing recipes across sources that use honey syrups complicated, we tried to state what the original source uses in the recipe text. If no extra information is given, assume the syrup to be 1:1 by volume (eq ~1.4:1 by mass). Proteins in natural honey provide structure to bubbles in shaken drinks.
1 oz
The second most common juice used in cocktails. This citrus juice is about 6% acid; 4% from citric and 2% from malic, with small amounts of succinic acid (this is what gives it a little bloody taste). Lime juice should be used the day it is squeezed, some like it freshly squeezed and others like it a few hours old.
1 tsp
Peat is a dried soil from peatlands, bogs, mires, moors and muskegs. In Scotland, peat fires are used to dry the malted barley, giving the whiskey a smoky flavor.
1 piece
A crystallized sweetened candy made from ginger. You can make it yourself; Google it!
1 wheel
A yellow citrus fruit. The peel is often used as a garnish while the juice incorporated into the drink for a tart flavor profile (citric acid).
1 leaf
A tropical plant with a tart yellow fruit. Most often used in tiki cocktails and fizzes.

Shake all ingredients, except scotch, with ice. Strain into an ice-filled rocks glass. Float the scotch over the drink on the back of a barspoon. Garnish with a piece of candied ginger, a lemon wheel and a pineapple leaf. #shake #ontherocks


Created by Scotty Scuder. Thanks Namir for sending the recipe.


Fresh
Sweet
Travel Finds, Dirty Dick’s, Paris
avg. 4.6 (101)
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