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Eggnog, AB

Alton Brown's Nog


12
You know what eggs are. In cocktails, eggs are used for their foaming properties, giving the drink a rich and creamy texture. The eggs proteins form a 'net' that traps air and liquid extremely well; for this reason, drinks that contain eggs are shaken. They are also used for egg washing, a type of booze washing. Some cocktails use only the egg white (fizzes) and some use the whole egg or only the yolk (flips). There are common non-egg substitutes out there, check out insta-foam
1.33 cup
Granulated sugar is a sucrose formed with glucose and fructose join by covalent bonding. Sugar is soluble in water, increasing the surface area (smaller grain size) or heating the water, dissolves sugar faster. Some cocktails use sugar directly but more use it indirectly in syrups/liqueurs.
1 pint
A mixture of half cream and half milk, usually 10-18% milkfat, super common in the USA and not super common everywhere else (kinda like fahrenheit). Substitute in your contry with single cream, light and extra light cream. This is used as a foaming agent and for fat-washing in cocktails.
1 pint
Milk, the nutritional protein and lactose packed white stuff, is used in some cocktails for a foamy structure and leathery mouthfeel. It is also used in a technique called fat-washing, google dat!
1 pint
The butterfat layer skimmed from the top of milk before homogenization, contains more than 35% milk fat. Also called single/double cream and whipping cream, although these may also add thickening agents making them less useful for mixing in cocktails. This is used as a foaming agent and for fat-washing in cocktails.
1 cup
A rum aged in charred oak barrels that lend their color to the rum. If a recipe calls for this rum it is likely refuring to a darker colored rum with a rich and strong yet smooth flavor. Common varieties come from Jamaica and Haiti.
1 cup
A brandy produced in the wine-region surrounding Cognac, France. Cognac must be twice distilled and aged for at least two years in French oak.
1 cup
A whiskey made primarily from a corn grain mash, aged in charred oak barrels.
1 tsp
The seed from an evergreen tree, used as a grated garnish in many cocktails. A must for egg-nog and egg-nog like drinks. In sufficent amounts it gives a numbing sensation.
0.25 tsp
Often used to rim a glass for cocktails or made into a solution to add to the liguid itself in order to balance the flavors. Table salt or common salt is a mineral composed primarily of sodium chloride (NaCl), a chemical compound belonging to the larger class of salts; salt in its natural form as a crystalline mineral is known as rock salt or halite.
0 grated
The seed from an evergreen tree, used as a grated garnish in many cocktails. A must for egg-nog and egg-nog like drinks. In sufficent amounts it gives a numbing sensation.

Separate the eggs and store the whites for another purpose (make some fizzes). Beat the yolks with the sugar and nutmeg in a large mixing bowl until the mixture lightens in color and falls off the whisk in a solid ribbon. Combine dairy, booze and salt in a second bowl or pitcher, slowly beat into the egg mixture. Move to a large glass jar and store in the fridge for 2 weeks minimum. A month would be better, and two better still. Serve in mugs or cups topped with grated nutmeg on top. #batch #straight


“The word nog was an Old English term for ale, and a noggin was the cup from whence it was drunk.”-AB


Creamy
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