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Kikuya Lapu


0.25 oz
A juice used in some cocktails for its tart and sweet taste as well as beautiful reddish-purple color. The astringent (mouth drying) properties of cranberry juice can be removed by a process called washing, which negates the polyphenols.
0.5 oz
The second most common juice used in cocktails. This citrus juice is about 6% acid; 4% from citric and 2% from malic, with small amounts of succinic acid (this is what gives it a little bloody taste). Lime juice should be used the day it is squeezed, some like it freshly squeezed and others like it a few hours old.
0.75 oz
A citrus juice used in many cocktails, both for its sweet and tart taste and its color. Orange juice, unlike lemon and lime, can be kept fresh for days. In a blind taste test, most people liked day-old orange juice.
0.75 oz
A tropical fruit, used in many tropical cocktails for its sweet flavor and yellow color. You can either juice a real pineapple, buy pineapple canned in juice (not syrup) or buy pineapple juice in a container.
0.75 oz
A juice used in some cocktails for its tart and acidic properties. Grapefruit juice can be pre-squeezed and kept fresh for many days like orange juice, unlike lemon and lime juice.
0.75 oz
A concentrated fruit syrup made from the pulp or 'juice' of passion fruits. You can make it by combining equal parts (by mass) pasison fruit purée to simple syrup. We always use 1:1 syrup unless otherwise noted in the recipe itself.
0.75 oz
A syrup produced by bees (apis). Pure honey is 82% sugar and very viscous, if you add 64g water to every 100g honey you can make a thinner honey syrup that will substitute (with respect to sweetness) for simple syrup in any recipe, equivalent to 1.1:1 honey to water by volume. We try to always use 1:1 syrups by mass. However, most sources measure honey syrups by volume, this tends to make comparing recipes across sources that use honey syrups complicated, we tried to state what the original source uses in the recipe text. If no extra information is given, assume the syrup to be 1:1 by volume (eq ~1.4:1 by mass). Proteins in natural honey provide structure to bubbles in shaken drinks.
1.5 oz
A subset of aged (dark) rums that specifically come from Jamaica. These rums are highly regarded for their unusual pot-still funk, necessary for certain classic cocktails.
0.5 oz
A high proof, usually 151, (>57.5 ABV) unaged rum. Most producers are based in Jamaica, such as Wray & Nephew (W&N). This rum is usually reserved for mixed drinks and is a key ingredient in many classic cocktails.
1 dash
A concentrated aromatic bitters made in Trinidad from water, ethanol, gentian and other herbs and spices; used in many classic cocktails like the Manhattan.
6 drop
A major producer of the French liqueur pastis, an anise-flavored liqueur. A successor of Absinthe, it was produced under that moniker until it was banned in france in the early 1900s. Henri Pernod, then focused its efforts on the lower-alcohol, wormwoodless, anise-flavored Pernod.
3 drop
The essence of almond, also known as a tincture. A few drops will do ya.
1 wedge
A tropical plant with a tart yellow fruit. Most often used in tiki cocktails and fizzes.
1
In cocktails, cherries are sweetened in a brine, like maraschino cherries (marr-ə-SKEE-noh) or in brandy, like brandied cherries. They are usually used as a garnish, muddled into the cocktail, or used simple for their sweetened brine.
1 sprig
Aromatic plants used in cocktails as a garnish or muddled into the liquor to add a light fresh taste. Common in the Mint Julep.

Shake everything with plenty of ice. Pour unstrained into a snifter or Tiki bowl, adding more ice to fill. Garnish with pineapple, cherry, mint, and a paper parasol. #shake #ontherocks


Created in 1992 by Bob Eskimo for the Kikuya Restaurant.


Fresh
Sweet
Beachbum Berry Remixed
avg. 4.1 (7)
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