MIXEL

open in Mixel

Mai Tai, SC


0.75 oz
The second most common juice used in cocktails. This citrus juice is about 6% acid; 4% from citric and 2% from malic, with small amounts of succinic acid (this is what gives it a little bloody taste). Lime juice should be used the day it is squeezed, some like it freshly squeezed and others like it a few hours old.
0.5 oz
A liqueur predominantly flavored with the dried peels of the laraha orange native to the island of Curaçao. Curaçao liqueur likely originated in the 1600s from the Dutch spirit company Bols after the West Indies Company controlled trade from the island. The liqueur comes in many colors with blue being the original made by Bols, however the color is only added for effect and adds no flavor. Triple Sec (ie: Cointreau) is considered a white Curaçao.
0.25 oz
A sweet syrup made from almonds, sugar, and rose water or orange flower water. Sometimes other nut derived syrups are referred to as orgeat. You can make this yourself! There's a few recipes, this one if from liquid Intelligence. Combine 660g very hot water with 200g nuts of your choice (almonds are traditional). Blend together at high speed, then strain through a fine strainer or cheescloth. Add salt if you'd like. Then combine 500g nut milk with 500g sugar, blend to combine. If the emulsion breaks, use a stick blender to quickly recombine (or shake hard before using). If you're up for it, add 1.75g Ticaloid 210s and 0.2g xanthan gum to stablize the emulsion. If you can't find Ticaloid, use a mixture of gum arabic and xanthan gum in a ratio of 9:1. This recipe doesn't use rose or orange flower water, if you'd like you can add small teaspoon of either.
0.25 oz
This syrup swaps in golden-hued demerara or turbinado sugar as opposed to processed/bleached white sugar. This gives a deeper, almost caramel-like flavor with a funky molasses nose popular in tropical drinks. We always use 1:1 syrup unless otherwise noted in the recipe itself.
2 oz
A subset of aged (dark) rums that specifically come from Jamaica. These rums are highly regarded for their unusual pot-still funk, necessary for certain classic cocktails.
1 wedge
Small, round, green citrus fruits. Commonly used in many cocktails for its rind or its acidic taste (6% acid total; 4% citric, 2% malic, some succinic acid).
1 sprig
Aromatic plants used in cocktails as a garnish or muddled into the liquor to add a light fresh taste. Common in the Mint Julep.

Combine all the ingredients with 12 oz of crushed ice and a few agitator cubes. Shake until chilled and open pour into a double old fashioned glass. Garnish with a spent lime shell and mint sprig. #shake #ontherocks


The recipe actually calls for 1/4 oz Mai Tai syrup. To make: combine 1 cup Demerara sugar, 1/2 cup water, a couple drops of vanilla extract and a pinch of salt. Heat until dissolved.


Strong
Fresh
Smuggler’s Cove
avg. 4.7 (204)
Sorting, filtering, sharing:
There's so much more in the Mixel App!