MIXEL

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Puka Punch


1 oz
The second most common juice used in cocktails. This citrus juice is about 6% acid; 4% from citric and 2% from malic, with small amounts of succinic acid (this is what gives it a little bloody taste). Lime juice should be used the day it is squeezed, some like it freshly squeezed and others like it a few hours old.
0.75 oz
A citrus juice used in many cocktails, both for its sweet and tart taste and its color. Orange juice, unlike lemon and lime, can be kept fresh for days. In a blind taste test, most people liked day-old orange juice.
0.75 oz
A tropical fruit, used in many tropical cocktails for its sweet flavor and yellow color. You can either juice a real pineapple, buy pineapple canned in juice (not syrup) or buy pineapple juice in a container.
1 oz
A syrup produced by bees (apis). Pure honey is 82% sugar and very viscous, if you add 64g water to every 100g honey you can make a thinner honey syrup that will substitute (with respect to sweetness) for simple syrup in any recipe, equivalent to 1.1:1 honey to water by volume. We try to always use 1:1 syrups by mass. However, most sources measure honey syrups by volume, this tends to make comparing recipes across sources that use honey syrups complicated, we tried to state what the original source uses in the recipe text. If no extra information is given, assume the syrup to be 1:1 by volume (eq ~1.4:1 by mass). Proteins in natural honey provide structure to bubbles in shaken drinks.
0.75 oz
A concentrated fruit syrup made from the pulp or 'juice' of passion fruits. You can make it by combining equal parts (by mass) pasison fruit purée to simple syrup. We always use 1:1 syrup unless otherwise noted in the recipe itself.
0.5 oz
An alcoholic falernum syrup liqueur with ABV between 11-35 ABV; we chose the most common 11%. Falernum is mainly used in tropical drinks but can also be drank by itself. It usually has flavors of almond, ginger, cloves, vanilla, allspice and lime.
1 oz
A rum aged in charred oak barrels that lend their color to the rum. If a recipe calls for this rum it is likely refuring to a darker colored rum with a rich and strong yet smooth flavor. Common varieties come from Jamaica and Haiti.
1 oz
Also referred to as silver or white, light rums are unaged, aged in steel, or aged in oak and have had their color filtered out, and usually have a sweeter and lighter taste than darker rum varieties. The name refers to these rums lighter or clear color.
0.75 oz
A sub-set of dark, molasses-driven rums. These rums are very dark in color from added refined sugar (molasses), multiple distillation, and likely, but not always, aging in charred oak. There is no formal definition of black rum, if a recipe calls for this type of rum, it is usually refering to a very very darkly colored rum; a common example is Gosling's Black Seal. Pair it with lemon, lime, ginger and pineapple.
1 dash
A concentrated aromatic bitters made in Trinidad from water, ethanol, gentian and other herbs and spices; used in many classic cocktails like the Manhattan.
0.75 oz
A high proof (>57.5 ABV) dark/black rum, that may be specifically from one origin or a blend from many. Common examples are Plantation OFTD and Lemon Hart 151.
1 sprig
Aromatic plants used in cocktails as a garnish or muddled into the liquor to add a light fresh taste. Common in the Mint Julep.

Add all the ingredients except the black blended overproof rum to a drink mixer tin. Fill with 18 ounces of crushed ice and 4 to 6 small “agitator” cubes. Flash blend and open pour into a large brandy snifter and add crushed ice if needed to fill. Float the overproof rum by gently pouring on the surface of the drink, then add garnish. #blend #ontherocks



Fresh
Strong
Smuggler’s Cove
avg. 4.6 (46)
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