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Tortuga


1 oz
A high proof (>57.5 ABV) dark/black rum, that may be specifically from one origin or a blend from many. Common examples are Plantation OFTD and Lemon Hart 151.
1.25 oz
Also referred to as silver or white, light rums are unaged, aged in steel, or aged in oak and have had their color filtered out, and usually have a sweeter and lighter taste than darker rum varieties. The name refers to these rums lighter or clear color.
1 oz
Also known as Vermouth di Torino, Italian vermouth, rosso and red vermouth; these vermouth have been sweetened with cane sugar or caramelized sugar, usually giving the vermouth 10-15% sugar and a slightly reddish brown color.
0.5 oz
A liqueur predominantly flavored with the dried peels of the laraha orange native to the island of Curaçao. Curaçao liqueur likely originated in the 1600s from the Dutch spirit company Bols after the West Indies Company controlled trade from the island. The liqueur comes in many colors with blue being the original made by Bols, however the color is only added for effect and adds no flavor. Triple Sec (ie: Cointreau) is considered a white Curaçao.
0.5 oz
Crème de Cacao White is a clear liqueur with a milk chocolate flavor, underpinned by faint vanilla and apricot tones.
0.5 oz
The second most common juice used in cocktails. This citrus juice is about 6% acid; 4% from citric and 2% from malic, with small amounts of succinic acid (this is what gives it a little bloody taste). Lime juice should be used the day it is squeezed, some like it freshly squeezed and others like it a few hours old.
0.5 oz
The most common fruit juice used in cocktails. This citrus juice is about 6% acid; pure citric acid. Lemon juice should be used the day it is squeezed, some like it freshly squeezed and others like it a few hours old.
0.5 oz
A citrus juice used in many cocktails, both for its sweet and tart taste and its color. Orange juice, unlike lemon and lime, can be kept fresh for days. In a blind taste test, most people liked day-old orange juice.
0.25 oz
A commonly used syrup made from pomegranate juice, characterized by a flavour that is both tart and sweet, and by a deep red colour. Coming from the French spelling of pomegranate, 'grenade.' To make it yourself (don't buy it premade) combine 100% pomegranate juice (like the Pom Wonderful brand) with equal parts sugar by mass. We always use 1:1 syrup unless otherwise noted in the recipe itself.
1 wedge
Small, round, green citrus fruits. Commonly used in many cocktails for its rind or its acidic taste (6% acid total; 4% citric, 2% malic, some succinic acid).

Shake everything with ice cubes. Strain into a tall glass filled with crushed ice. Garnish with a lime wedge. #shake #ontherocks


By Trader Vic, circa 1939. From Vic’s 1946 Book Of Food and Drink.


Strong
Sweet
Potions Of The Caribbean
avg. 3.3 (22)
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